Video

The Amazing Race: James and Krystel Weening from Barrie

26 Feb

Our friends James and Krystel are applying for the season premiere of Amazing Race Canada. They asked me to create this 3 minute audition video for them.

As I’m getting more and more into the video scene, I’ve realized the importance of collaboration. I’ve got a good handle on composition, lighting, and telling a visual story. But when it comes to cutting down a final video, there can be a lot to sift through. Taking 45 minutes of footage and cutting it down to 3 minutes can feel overwhelming. My wife, Lydia has been a great help in keeping the ball rolling in our interviews and promo videos – as I focus on the technical camera work. It turns out she’s also a natural at editing. We both had our hands in the final edit for this, and I think it’s stronger for it. On top of working with her, my brother was only a phone call away offering assistance in getting the best audio set up.

Projects can only be strengthened through working with a solid team, and receiving wisdom and feedback from friends, family and mentors. And I’m incredibly thankful for those who are there for me!

Video

Lighting and Filming a Nativity Scene

30 Dec

 

Earlier this month I took the role of DOP (Director of Photography) on a couple of Christmas videos for Mapleview Community Church in Barrie. Lydia and I have been attending for a few years now, and I’ve been working more and more with their media pastor, Michael Fess. On top of dozens of other roles he plays, Mike takes care of video production.

Mike had a couple ideas for some videos he wanted to create for the Christmas Eve service at Mapleview, and asked if I would help out. He produced, directed and edited the videos and left the cinematography, and lighting in my hands.

Producing can take up a lot of time. Getting costumes, locations, equipment, talent, storyboards – and keeping people happy on set all takes time and energy. Good producing makes the shooting of a video a smooth experience. It allows the day of filming to simply go from point A to point B – with everything in order to do so. For me, it was really nice to be able to step onto the set with the equipment, and basically start lighting the scene in a way that suited the story Mike wanted to tell. I didn’t have to worry about all the production stuff – and could focus entirely on lighting and filming.

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ChineseLantern_FilmLightingOne of the most fun parts of the evening was creating the Chinese Lantern on a stick. Even big film sets will use large paper lanterns with dimmable lightbulbs inside. They’ll hover the lights in close to the subject to create a nice soft light that puts a bit of a glow in the eye of the subject. I thought one of these could be really useful to us in both this video and the 2nd video we shot – so Mike and I went to Home Depot and grabbed the components. He already had a $7 IKEA paper lantern. Another 30 bucks got us a dimmer switch, the casing, lamp wire, and a pack of lightbulbs.

As well as the Chinese Lantern, we used a Tungsten light in a soft box for our key light – along with an LED panel to add some cooler light to the background. The idea was to mimic light from an oil lamp, or a small fire burning nearby – and some cool moonlight coming in the window.

Mike and I are already currently putting together some ideas for future productions, so I’m sure I will be sharing more material that him and I have worked on in the future!

Thanks for taking a look at my work, and feel free to stay in touch with me via Twitter, Facebook, or email!

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